Hidden Brain The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.
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Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps

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Study Looks At How People Think About Free Speech

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Hidden Brain: How Cigarette Taxes Affect Food Buying

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Researchers Examine When People Are More Susceptible To Fake News

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According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Pain Before Pleasure Makes The Pleasure Even Better, Study Finds

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Research shows birth order really does matter. Catherine Delahaye/Getty Images hide caption

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Research Shows Birth Order Really Does Matter

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New study shows child care centers don't necessarily hire the most qualified teachers. Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury/Getty Images hide caption

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Child Care Centers Often Don't Hire The Most Qualified Teachers, Study Shows

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From sports, to politics, to the stock market, we love to make (and hear) predictions. This week, Hidden Brain explores why the so-called experts are so often wrong, and how we can avoid the common pitfalls of telling the future. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hidden Brain: Terror Strikes And An Attacker's Identity

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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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