The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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Don't Feed Parrots Chocolate, Despite What Happens In Minecraft

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Little Red Door, a small non-profit in East Central Indiana was hacked in January and, months later, is still recovering. Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Small Indiana Nonprofit Falls Victim To Ransom Cyberattack

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Dan Howley tries out the Google Daydream View virtual-reality headset and controller on Oct. 4, 2016, following a product event in San Francisco. This week, Google announced plans for stand-alone VR goggles that won't need to be attached to a PC or smartphone. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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Google Is Investing In 'Immersive Technology'

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Morning News Brief: Robert Mueller As Special Counsel, New Google Products

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home

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In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. A hacking group linked to North Korea has used code that's identical to some of the malware used in the WannaCry attack, security researchers say. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack on a laptop in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws

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Cyberattack Culprits Demand Ransom Be Paid In Bitcoins

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Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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Ransomware Attacks Begin To Stabilize After Compromising Networks Worldwide

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Hackers Likely Stole NSA Research To Conduct Global Ransomware Attack

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Former White House CIO Outlines How To Safe Guard Against Malware

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After the WannaCry cyberattack hit computer systems worldwide, Microsoft says governments should report software vulnerabilities instead of collecting them. Here, a ransom window announces the encryption of data on a transit display in eastern Germany on Friday. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images