The federal CHIP program funds health care for almost 9 million children. Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images

Heading someplace where you could get traveler's diarrhea? Try packing some prophylactic pills containing bismuth subsalicylate, such as Pepto Bismol. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Tips For Staying Healthy When Traveling Abroad

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Yamtono Sardi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

If Raw Fruits Or Veggies Give You A Tingly Mouth, It's A Real Syndrome

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For children over 1 year old, pediatricians strongly recommend whole fruit instead of juice, because it contains fiber, which slows the absorption of sugar and fills you up the way juice doesn't. KathyDewar/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Dilan Ellegala, left, supervises Dr. Emmanuel Nuwas of Tanzania as he inserts a shunt in a baby with hydrocephalus. Ellegala has played a key role in training local doctors, as described in the new book A Surgeon in the Village. Early on, he trained a hospital staffer who wasn't a doctor to do brain surgery. Tony Bartelme hide caption

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Tony Bartelme

Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron which injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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50 Years Ago, A Network Of Clergy Helped Women Seeking Abortion

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Health Care Industry Drives Job Growth At The Expense Of Efficiency

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A patient is tested for malaria at a clinic in Kenya. U.S. funding for antimalarial efforts, HIV prevention and other programs abroad could be affected by the newly expanded "Mexico City policy." Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

In a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos in the White House on Thursday, President Trump said the Affordable Care Act "is collapsing." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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