Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Live From Chicago...It's Code Switch!

Code Switch podcast hosts Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Live From Chicago...It's Code Switch!

Hosts Shereen and Gene take on Chi-City with help from Chicago-natives Eve Ewing and Natalie Y. Moore, plus Code Switch's play cousin, Hari Kondabolu. Ewing opens the show with a poem from her new collection, Electric Arches. Kondabolu talks about his upcoming documentary, "The Problem with Apu." And Moore brings her Chicago-expertise to some tough questions from our listeners.

Live From Chicago...It's Code Switch!

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564162692/564277305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Reflections On A Year At Ron Brown High

Ron Brown is an all-boys school in Washington, D.C., aimed specifically at teaching young men of color. LA Johnson hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson

Reflections On A Year At Ron Brown High

We spent the past three episodes looking at the first year of a high school for black boys in Washington, D.C. Now, we're taking a look back on our reporting. What does it mean for a school like Ron Brown to exist — and what does that say about our society?

Reflections On A Year At Ron Brown High

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562566811/562655995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
To Fail Or Not To Fail: The Fierce Debate Over High Standards

Ron Brown LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

To Fail Or Not To Fail: The Fierce Debate Over High Standards

With 40 percent of its students at risk of failing, one radical new high school in Washington, D.C. wrestles with whether to lower its own high expectations.

To Fail Or Not To Fail: The Fierce Debate Over High Standards

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561160572/561272646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'They Can't Just Be Average,' Lifting Students Up Without Lowering The Bar

Ron Brown College Prep LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

'They Can't Just Be Average,' Lifting Students Up Without Lowering The Bar

In a radical new high school in Washington, D.C., the push for academic success sometimes clashes with providing young men the love and support they need to thrive.

'They Can't Just Be Average,' Lifting Students Up Without Lowering The Bar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559880193/559908540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School
LA Johnson/NPR

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

Too many young, black men struggle in America's education system. Washington D.C. is trying to do something about it with a new, boys-only high school. NPR's Cory Turner and Education Week's Kavitha Cardoza spent hundreds of hours there, reporting on the birth of a school built on one word: Love.

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/558284925/558420654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Passing Of A "Failing" School

Wilkinsburg High School's class of 2016, its last graduating class after over a century in operation. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

The Passing Of A "Failing" School

When a school shuts down, students lose more than a place of learning; they lose friends, mentors and a community. This is an experience that disproportionately affects black students in the U.S. Shereen Marisol Meraji looks at what it's like when a predominantly black suburb outside Pittsburgh loses its only public high school.

The Passing Of A "Failing" School

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556968554/556981607" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Puerto Rico, My Heart's Devotion

Puerto Ricans are migrants not immigrants, Spanish and English, domestic yet foreign — as we like to say on Code Switch, it's complicated. A hundred years ago this week, Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens by law with the passing of the Jones Act. Since then, they've had a complicated and fraught relationship with what it means to be America .Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
.Kristen Uroda for NPR

Puerto Rico, My Heart's Devotion

The haphazard response to Hurricane Maria has underscored the tricky, in-between space that Puerto Ricans occupy. They're U.S. citizens — although nearly half of the country doesn't know that. But those who live in Puerto Rico don't enjoy many of the same privileges as citizens on the mainland. In this week's episode, Shereen travels to one of the most Puerto Rican enclaves in the country to explore the fraught relationship Puerto Ricans have with their American-ness.

Puerto Rico, My Heart's Devotion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555430389/555480747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Befuddled By Babies, Love And Ice Pops? Ask Code Switch
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Befuddled By Babies, Love And Ice Pops? Ask Code Switch

When social interactions become racially charged, sometimes even the most woke among us are prone to faux pas. So this week, we're taking on our listeners' most burning questions about race. We'll talk weddings. We'll talk kiddos. And most of all, we'll talk paletas.

Befuddled By Babies, Love And Ice Pops? Ask Code Switch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553859120/553869474" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

As the burgeoning marijuana industry booms, who is reaping the benefits, and who is being left behind? Chelsea Beck hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

The history of cannabis in the U.S. ― and its criminalization ― is deeply interwoven with race. As the legal cannabis market gains traction, people of color who were targeted by the drug war could be left out of the green rush.

A Weed Boom, But For Whom?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/551878709/552249300" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

Amy Gonzalez lives in the hottest part of Los Angeles, where average temperatures are rising. Molly Peterson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Peterson for NPR

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

On this week's episode we talk about why certain communities are more vulnerable to catastrophic weather events like hurricanes and heat waves. Saying "mother nature doesn't discriminate," ignores the fact that discrimination exacerbates her wrath.

It's Getting (Dangerously) Hot in Herre

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550452204/550561079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Back To Top