World World music and features from NPR news, NPR cultural programs, and NPR Music stations.

The late Dr. G Yunupingu performing in Melbourne, Australia in 2008. In accordance with Aboriginal custom, his family and record label have requested that no photos of his face be used. Kristian Dowling/Getty Images hide caption

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Kristian Dowling/Getty Images

For Mogoya, her first album in eight years, Oumou Sangaré enlisted young Swedish and French producers to help rejuvenate her sound. Benoit Peverelli/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Benoit Peverelli/Courtesy of the artist
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South African legend Miriam Makeba performing at Zaire 74. The performances of the African artists on the 1974 music festival's lineup have been unearthed for a new live album. Courtesy of Stewart Levine hide caption

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Courtesy of Stewart Levine

Before The Rumble In The Jungle, Music Rang Out At Zaire 74

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Aamir Ame co-wrote the viral hit "Dead Eye," a tribute to Kashmiris whose eyesight was damaged by pellet guns used by security forces to quell demonstrations. He calls it his first "political" song. Syed Shahriyar hide caption

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Syed Shahriyar

A New Generation Of Kashmir Rappers Vents Its Rage In The Valley

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Les Amazones d'Afrique's new album is called République Amazone. Tiago Augusto/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tiago Augusto/Courtesy of the artist

Les Amazones D'Afrique Envision A World Of Gender Equality

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The Indian vocalist Kishori Amonkar and tabla player Zakir Hussain posing at an awards ceremony in Mumbai, India in February 2016. Amonkar died on April 3, 2017 at age 84. STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images

Ahmed (left) and Hasan Alzuabi perform at Sound Stage Studios in Nashville. Ann Powers/NPR hide caption

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Ann Powers/NPR

World Cafe Nashville: Ahmed And Hasan Alzuabi

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Cuban drummer Yissy García is one of Betto Arcos' travel finds. Larisa López/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Larisa López/Courtesy of the artist

DJ Betto Arcos Shares Essential Songs From His Travels In Cuba

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Pakistani cyclists ride past a wall image of late Sufi musician Amjad Sabri alongside a street in Karachi on June 27, 2016. Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

After His Assassination, A Pakistani Artist's Family Keeps His Song Alive

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Relatives comfort Mujjudid Sabri (front, center), son of Pakistani singer Amjad Sabri, who was killed Wednesday in an attack by gunmen in Karachi. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images