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Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

'Millions' Fewer Americans Would Have Coverage Under GOP Health Bill, Says CBO Analysis

The Congressional Budget Office says it won't have time to analyze the full impacts of the latest Republican effort to throw out the Affordable Care Act, but the agency says millions more would be uninsured by 2026.

Marines participate in an exercise during the Infantry Officer Course in August at Quantico, Va. The first female Marine to complete the course graduated on Monday. Master Gunnery Sgt. Chad McMeen/Office of Marine Corps Communication hide caption

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Master Gunnery Sgt. Chad McMeen/Office of Marine Corps Communication

First Female Marine Completes Grueling Infantry Officer Course

The 13-week program is considered one of the toughest in the U.S. military, and one-third of the class dropped out before graduation. The lieutenant has asked to keep her identity private.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2014 White House Correspondents' Association Dinner in Washington, D.C. Speechwriter David Litt, who helped craft the president's comedy routine that night, says, "Some of the joke is always that it's the president telling a joke." Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

A Former Speechwriter Looks Back On His 'Hopey, Changey' Years With Obama

Fresh Air

David Litt says writing speeches and jokes for former President Obama was often a delicate task: "There's a whole industry of people trying to take your words out of context."

A Former Speechwriter Looks Back On His 'Hopey, Changey' Years With Obama

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North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho leaves his hotel in New York on Sept. 25, 2017. Ri says that President Donald Trump has declared war on North Korea — and that the country can now defend itself under international law. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

'Declaration Of War' Means North Korea Can Shoot Down U.S. Bombers, Minister Says

North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho says that under international law, his country can legally shoot down U.S. military planes — even if they're not in North Korea's airspace.

Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka Trump, reportedly set up a private email account as their family was coming into power in Washington. They're seen here last week at left, sitting with Lara Trump and Eric Trump. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jared Kushner Used Private Email In Trump Administration, Lawyer Confirms

Emails have been a central theme for President Trump, who has repeatedly said that Democratic rival Hillary Clinton should face federal criminal charges over her use of private email.

Cars sit along the street in Houston following Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30. Car rental companies made preparations to move vehicles into affected areas even before the storm hit. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Rental Firms' Disaster Readiness May Help Usher The Age Of Self-Driving Cars

With more than 1 million autos damaged in recent hurricanes, rental firms have had to move cars quickly into affected areas. That involves tech tools and data, keys to a future of autonomous fleets.

Rental Firms' Disaster Readiness May Help Usher The Age Of Self-Driving Cars

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In his new book, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella explores how he's had to work on his capacity for empathy to change the company's culture. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Do You Turn Around A Tech Giant? With Empathy, Microsoft CEO Says

Despite the wonky title, Hit Refresh by Satya Nadella is actually a meditation on the soul — his and his company's.

How Do You Turn Around A Tech Giant? With Empathy, Microsoft CEO Says

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Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

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Courtesy of Cacao de Origen

How A Venezuelan Chef Is Teaching Women To Make Chocolate And Money

Some of the world's best cacao grows in Venezuela, a country roiled by political turmoil. One chocolatier is betting those beans can propel a whole industry and turn women into micro-entrepreneurs.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

Researchers and physicians say a study suggesting a link between the flu vaccine and miscarriage in a limited population is cause for more research, not a reason to change vaccination recommendations.

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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